Phineas Blood Taylor and his Families

Phineas Blood Taylor was born 24 October 1820, in Nova Scotia, the fourth child of Bennett Ingraham Taylor and Eleanor Blood Morton. His father was a highly respected pastor of the Baptist church in the Lunenberg and nearby Barrs Corner area of Nova Scotia, probably of Loyalist descent, while the Mortons were Planters who came to Nova Scotia before the American Revolutionary War.

Phineas married Sarah A Joyce, and according to the Chute Genealogy (William Chute),  they had six children (not named by Chute.) I think there were actually seven.

Phineas was in the 1861 Canada census in Cumberland County. The census only named heads of household, and his household had 3 males and 6 females, one of which was under the age of one. These statistics would match up to Phineas and sons William and Thomas, and his wife Sarah and daughters Mary, Eleanor, Alveretta, Catherine (also called Cassie), and baby Susan. The 1861 census is the last primary record that we know refers to Phineas, son of Bennett.

Other records helped confirm the family group. For example, son William’s death record names his mother, Sarah Joyce, but not his father. Mary’s marriage record to Edward Gould names both parents, but doesn’t say whether her father is still living at the time of this marriage. Eleanor’s marriage record to James Chandler names both parents, as does the marriage record for Alveretta (or Alfaretta) to Henry Smith.

Sarah Taylor was the head of the household in 1871, and the family included William, Cassie, Thomas and Susan, as well as married daughter Eleanor and her family. Notes written in the remarks column of the census sheet indicate that Sarah’s husband left 10 years ago and hasn’t returned. Perhaps she wasn’t sure whether to count him in the household, but the census did list her as married.

In 1881, Sarah reported that she was widowed. She lived with her daughter Susan Jeffers and family. In 1891, she lived at River Hébert with her son William and his family. The household included her widowed daughter Susan and the Jeffers children. In 1901, Sarah lived with her Jeffers grandchildren. Sarah died in 1907.

So what happened to her husband Phineas? Family lore is that he left Nova Scotia to go to Kansas to work in the wheat harvest, and never returned.

The 1875 Kansas state census lists a Phineas Taylor born about 1820 in Nova Scotia. Phineas was a farmer, and the household included Melinda J (probably an error, as she is called Melissa J in later records) age 32, housewife born in New Jersey, and Phineas Jr age 6, born in Kansas, “at school”. They lived in Paola, Miami County, Kansas. I have been unable to find a birth record for Phineas Jr. Family Search has Kansas marriage records on line. They do not have a searchable index, but the marriage books each have a printed index in the front. I was not able to find Phineas marrying in Miami County. I also was not able to find this family in the 1870 US (or 1871 Canada) census.

The same family group was in the 1880 census in Paola. Phineas was age 60, and a laborer. His wife was Melissa, born in New Jersey, with son Phineas, age 11, born in Kansas. The household included boarders Clara Hackett and Thomas Shillinglaw. A fairly well documented family tree on Ancestry says that Phineas died 27 Jun 1881 in Paola, although there is not an attached primary source for that event. There are also trees with a daughter, Margery, but no vital records attached to her name, and she doesn’t show up in the census family groups.  Since the family was counted in either the state or federal census every five years, it is likely that she died as a small child.

Kansas marriage records indicate that on 12 October 1882, Mrs. M. J. Taylor married L. F. Laird at Paola. Her prior marital status (widowed or divorced) is not listed. Her new husband was Lafrayne F Laird, a divorced stock raiser originally from Missouri. The 1885 state census lists LF Laird, MJ Laird, Lucy W age 2 months, and Phineas Taylor, age 16.

In 1889, Phineas Jr married Minnie Reifel in Paola. This record lists his parents as Phineas, and Melissa J Hawkins. She may be the Melissa J who is daughter of John Hawkins and Amanda Van Etten, as listed in 1860 census in Avon, Rock, Wisconsin. That Melissa married Charles Allen Sweet on 21 October 1862 in Rock County, Wisconsin. He remarried three years later – but was that due to divorce or death? Some on-line family trees say that this Melissa died after giving birth to daughter Addie, but no records are attached to prove this.  I have not yet found paperwork to show that Phineas Jr’s mother is that same Melissa Hawkins, but age and birth location make it likely.

The 1895 Kansas State Census lists Phineas Jr, his wife and children in Paola. Melissa Laird is with her husband, and daughter Lucy, in the same town.

The 1900 census shows Phineas Jr and his expanding family still in Paola, while the Lairds are in nearby Marysville.  Melissa reported being mother of four, with three still living.  This would correspond with Addie, Phineas, and Lucy, and Margery who died young, if this is the same Melissa.

In 1905, “Phin” and family are still in Paola, and LF and MJ Laird are in Marysville. Lucy had married by then, but died in 1905.

By 1910, Phineas Jr had moved his family to Oakland, CA, where he worked as a carpenter. He was counted there as late as the 1930 census, and the California Death Index lists a Phineas Taylor born about 1868 who died in Alameda CA on 20 March 1937.

Melissa Laird was listed in the 1910 census in Marysville Kansas, widowed, reporting four children born, two still living (Addie and Phineas – if this is the correct person).   She was also there in 1920.   I do not have a death date for her but did not find her in 1930.

Family lore is that Phineas’ son Thomas also left Nova Scotia and went west looking for his father, and he was never heard of again. Thomas was in Nova Scotia at the time of the 1871 and 1881 censuses. If Phineas really did die in 1881, then he may have died before Thomas even started looking for him. The obituary for Thomas’ brother William lists William’s surviving sisters, but doesn’t list Thomas as a “survived by”, so he may have died before William (1919) or he was just missing, status unknown. An unsourced tree on Ancestry lists Thomas as having a wife named Nancy Wait.

I sent a research request in to the historical society where Phineas and Melissa lived, but have not yet heard back from them.  I’m hoping that they will have information that will positively identify Phineas and Melissa.

Tristram B. Bailey

Tristram B. Bailey was the ninth of eleven children born to Timothy Bailey and Henrietta Blood. Variations of his first name include Tristin, Tristum, Tristrum, and Tristam. It is thought that his middle initial may stand for Bartlett because a granduncle was named Tristram Bartlett Bailey, b.12 April 1754, d. 7 June 1761 (Bailey Genealogy: James John and Thomas… by Gertrude E. Bailey, 1899, pg. 17). He often was referred to as T.B. Bailey in newspaper accounts.

Tristram was born 30 May 1830 and died 10 December 1889, both events occurring in Andover, MA. His siblings were Timothy (b. 29 November 1812), James (b. 2 September 1814, d. 12 July 1842 “died in Oregon Territory”- gravestone inscription, West Parish Garden Cemetery, Andover, MA. It is not known if his actual remains are buried in MA or if the stone is only a memorial), Henrietta (b.5 October 1816), Ebenezer (b. 10 April 1819, d. 24 September 1847), Rebecca (b. 16 April 1821), Rufus R. (b. 9 August 1823, d. 10 July 1911), Rachel (b. 11 December 1825), Warren A. (b. 9 July 1828, d. 2 May 1909), Roxanna (b. 26 June 1833), and Henry H. (b. 21 January 1835).

Tristram descended from three known supporters of the Revolutionary War. His paternal grandfather, William Bailey (b.13 February 1747, d. 12 March 1836) was a private under Col. Bridge and Capt. Frubush in Massachusetts. Tristram’s maternal grandfather, Royal Blood (b. 8 October 1758, d. 24 May 1825) served as a private under Capt. Aaron Jewett, Capt. Joshua Lealand, and Capt. John Porter as well as being a Marine on the frigate “Deane”. Royal’s military service started in 1777 and ended after 1782. Lastly, Tristram’s great grandfather, Joseph Blood (b. 8 May 1709, d. 5 January 1794) was a surveyor for the colonies.

Pamelia Emma Frye was Tristram’s first wife. Pamelia had been previously married to Nathan Bailey (b.28 April 1816, d. 8 January 1854, marriage to Pamelia 6 April 1839) who was believed to be some type of cousin to Tristram. Pamelia was literally “the girl next door”. In the 1855 Massachusetts State census Pamelia was living with her in-laws, Nathan Bailey, Sr. and Cloe, next door to Tristram and his parents. Tristram and Pamelia married 1 January 1856 in Methuen, MA. Pamelia also descended from Revolutionary War supporters. Her paternal grandfather and great grandfather, James Frye and Col. James Frye as well as her maternal grandfather, Seth Emerson all served in the military on the colonial side of the war.

Tristram and Pamelia were living in Andover, MA in 1860 and Tristram was the Superintendant of a Poor House. Mary A. Townsend was their servant. Emma Frances Bailey was born to the couple 12 December 1860. Pamelia died 22 June 1861, a little over six months after giving birth to Emma. Eight months later Tristram married his servant, Mary Augusta Townsend, 18 February 1862.

Mary and Tristram went on to have three children: James Henry Bailey (b. 3 June 1864 Andover, MA; d. 30 September 1936 Portland, OR), Mary Pamelia Bailey (b. 19 July 1867 Andover, MA; d. 6 October 1901 Lawrence, MA), Eben Elijah Bailey (b. 6 June 1869 Andover, MA). Emma had known no other mother than Mary and she lists Mary as her mother on her marriage certificates (there were two). It appears that she and her half-siblings were close.

Tristram was living in Andover, MA in the Federal Census for the years 1850, 1860, and 1870. In addition, he appears in the Massachusetts State Census for the years 1855 and 1865. With the exception of the 1860 census where he was a Superintendent of a Poor House, Tristram was a farmer, as was his father, Timothy. Though Tristram registered for the Civil War draft 18 June 1860 in Andover, MA no evidence has been found that he served in the military.

By 1875 city directory entries for Lawrence, MA indicate Tristram moved his family to Lawrence and started a laundry at 4 Water Street. The 1880 Federal Census reveals that Mary A. (Townsend) Bailey believed she was a widow but she continued to run the laundry at 4 Water Street in Lawrence with her two girls, Emma Frances and Mary Pamelia. The youngest son, Eben, was living with Tristram’s brother, Rufus, in Andover, MA.

Tristram and James turn up in the 1880 census in the Upper Deer Lodge Valley of Montana Territory. Tristram is listed as a farmer. His immediate neighbor is W.R.H. Edwards who homesteaded property near Anaconda, MT. An article in the New Northwest paper (7 May 1880) states Tristram had been involved in a “difficulty over a ranche” during which he was assaulted by Harry Eccleson and received a broken nose. Mr. “Eccleson was fined $10 plus costs”.

Further investigation of newspaper accounts and land records suggests Tristram first arrived in Montana Territory prior to 1 May 1876 when he sold his 1/5th share in a mining claim Lot 63, Fairweather Gulch, Moose Creek mining district south of Butte, MT. The purchaser was Joseph V. Suprenant. The date that he and the other four men first filed on the claim has not yet been determined.

The Butte Miner reported on 29 May 1877 “T.B. Bailey, who left here several months ago for a visit to his home in Massachusetts, returned to Butte last week, accompanied by several persons from his neighborhood. Mr. Bailey expects to make this his home now and will send for his family shortly.” Tristram sold property in the city of Butte located at the south east corner of the Mercury Street and Montana Street intersection (lot 19, block 51) on 26 May 1877. James Talbott, a local banker, was the purchaser. The year, 1877, was the year the city was platted. It is not known when Tristram acquired the property.

On 11 July 1877 Tristram again filed with four other men on another mining claim near the one he sold. The partners were Joseph V. Suprenant, Benjamin F. McElroy, Patrick J. Hamilton, and Andrew J. Grubb. The claim was Lot 43, Fairweather Gulch, Moose Creek mining district, Deer Lodge Co. (later known as Silver Bow Co.). It is not known if Tristram did any actual mining work or if he was a silent partner but by 1880 it appears he returned to farming which was the work he knew best.

It is important to understand the historical context of Tristram’s time. General George Custer lost his life and regiment at the Little Big Horn 25 June 1876 and the Battle of the Big Hole occurred 9-10 August 1877 in an area east of the Bitterroot Mountains and south east of Missoula, MT. The newspapers of the time were filled with stories of Indian hostilities.

Tristram or at least James, his son, returned to Massachusetts sometime before August 1882. A local newspaper reported that the husband of James’s half-sister, Emma Frances, drowned during a swimming accident on the Merimack River. Silas D. Daland (b. 1855, d. 13 August 1882), Emma’s husband, was swimming in the river while Emma watched from a boat. He became disabled by a cramp, shouting for help. Emma’s brothers, Eben and James, are both named in the article as attempting to rescue Silas but without success. Silas and Emma had been married less than eight weeks.

Another newspaper article in the Boston Daily Advertiser 25 November 1886 describes an event placing Tristram in North Andover, MA during that year. “T.B. Bailey, a farmer of North Andover, while digging on his farm,…” discovered a skeleton likely from a man who went missing 20 years before. The cause of death was a gunshot wound to the head.

Tristram died 1 January 1889 in North Andover, MA of “congestion of the liver”. His obituary described him as “a well known and much liked citizen” who was “of far more than ordinary ability, and well posted” (Lawrence American, 7 January 1889). It is thought that “well posted” means well traveled. Tristram’s remains were buried in the West Parish Garden Cemetery, Andover, MA, near his first wife’s grave. Though Mary A. (Townsend) Bailey remarried (John Aiken Shirley) she was buried with Tristram upon her death (or at least her name is on his headstone).

Tristram never moved his family to Montana but it appears that his son, James Henry, did return before 1885. James H. Bailey appears in the 1900 Federal Census living with his wife and children in Lewistown, MT. (It is important to note that James does NOT appear in Massachusetts records after 1882.) The James in the 1900 census was born in Massachusetts, as were his parents, and he was a plasterer. He was married to Mary Frances Butland. James appeared in the 1885 Butte school census with his first two children, Ernest (b. 1884, MT) and Ethel (b.1885 White Sulfur Springs, MT). He and Mary went on to have six more children: Augusta Valerie (b. 1887 Butte, MT), Myrtle L. (b. 1888, MT), Pansy (b. 1889, Anaconda, MT), James Archie (b. 1890, Oaksdale, WA), Leonard Leroy (b. 1893, Idaho), and Ralph (b. 1897, MT). Mary Frances died in 1901 and was buried in the Lewistown Cemetery.

James was gone from Lewistown by 1904. His youngest children were under the custody of the husband of James’s eldest daughter, Ethel, and another individual named Bailey who’s relationship to the family has not been determined. By 1910, James H. Bailey, a plasterer who was born in Massachusetts, appears in the Federal Census living in Post Falls, ID. He is married to Elizabeth Alice (Belles) Kibler, Wagstaff, Wright. They had a son named Melvin Lewis who was born 12 November 1905, Lewiston, ID. Melvin’s birth index entry gives the full name of both his parents.

No entry for James has been located for the 1920 Federal Census, though a 1917 city directory entry places a plaster with his name in Butte, MT. The 1930 Federal Census shows James H. Bailey, a plasterer, who was born in Massachusetts, living in Mt. Pleasant, OR outside of Portland. James had married a third time to Julia Etta (Parker) VanBlaricom. City directory entries indicate he lived in the Portland area until he died 30 September 1936. He is buried in an unmarked grave in Greenwood Hills Cemetery, Portland, OR. None of the three marriage records for James have been found. The early marriage records for Montana did not include the parents of the bride and groom and would be of little value confirming parentage. However, a photograph of James H. Bailey and Julia E. Bailey was discovered among the papers of James’s half- sister, Emma Frances, who lived in Lawrence, MA. The photograph had been taken by Sowell Studio, 113 1/2 Third Street, Portland, OR.

When and why Tristram and his son went to Montana is an interesting question. Tristram’s brother Timothy had a son named Charles Warren Bailey who was supposed to have been a soldier in Montana and later settled in Minnesota. Tristram’s brother, James, died in Oregon Territory when Tristram was only 12 years old. The lure of rich mining claims and free land probably had an influence. Perhaps he saw himself getting older and wanted an adventure before he died. It will likely never be known with certainty why he took such a huge risk, but contemplating his reasons projects the reader back in time to an exciting era of United States history. A time which will never be equaled.

(sources: 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, 1900, 1910, 1930 Federal Census records; 1855, 1865 Massachusetts State Census records; Bailey Genealogy: James John and Thomas, and their Descendants in Three Parts by Gertrude E. Bailey, 1899; birth, marriage & death records for Tristram’s grandparents, parents & siblings in Massachusetts; birth, marriage & death records for Pamelia and her parents, grandparents & great grandparents in Massachusetts; birth, marriage and death records for Tristram B. Bailey, Pamelia Frye, Mary A. Townsend and their children in Massachusetts; various birth, marriage & death records for James H. Bailey’s children in MT, ID & WA; school census records for Butte [Butte Public Archive] & Lewistown, MT; Lewistown Cemetery records; land records and deed from the Butte & Anaconda courthouses; newspaper articles from Boston & Lawrence, MA; newspaper articles from The Butte Miner and The New Northwest; City Directories for Lawrence, MA, Butte, MT & Portland, OR; Civil War draft registration for Andover, MA; family photograph of James & Julia Bailey)

[Story written and shared by Tristram's descendant Barbara S - comments and connections will be forwarded back to her.  Barbara and I are probably about 7th cousins through the Blood surname, which is an ancestor in my Hodges tree.]

Albert Warren Smith and Lucinda Priscilla Stone – Updated

Albert Warren Smith was born 2 September 1843, the second son of Joseph and Harriet (Newell) Smith, in Ipswich MA. Joseph was a cordwainer, which is a shoemaker. The index lists his middle name as Marion, but I believe this was a transcription error from Warren. The 1850 census says “Warren”. Joseph had a brother Warren who died as an infant, and his adopted daughter Josie Smith’s first son was Albert Warren Hodges.

Albert is in the 1860 census at home with his parents, occupation is brick mason. I found no records to indicate that he served in the Civil War.

Albert moved to Lynn MA. On 25 December 1867, he married Lucinda Priscilla Stone, daughter of William and Mary (Hodges Lewis) Stone. Since our Hodges family came from Ireland, and didn’t start moving to Massachusetts until later than this, I do not believe we are related to this branch of Hodges family – at least back to Europe. All subsequent records for Albert indicate that he lived the rest of his life in Lynn.

I had originally believed that Albert and Lucinda Priscilla had no children of their own, but with the release of new records at FamilySearch.org, I found that not to be the case. Their first child was Willie A, born 6 February, and died 25 August 1869 in Lynn. Willie’s cause of death was listed as teething. Teething used to be considered a cause of death, as many children died in the first year of life, the same time as teething occurs. In retrospect, some “teething” deaths may be what we would now call SIDS. Also, the treatment for teething sometimes involved lancing the gums with an instrument, or even a mother’s fingernail, to allow the teeth through, and this lancing may have led to infection. Rather than fever from teething, Willie may have cholera infantum, perhaps from drinking contaminated milk.

In 1870, Albert and Lucinda’s census record indicates that their real estate was valued at $2000, with personal property listed at $600. This would include household belongings as well as his tools from his work as a mason.

The second son, Lewis A, was born about January 1 1871, and the third son, Fred S, was born 14 April 1872. Both boys died on 22 July 1872, of cholera infantum. The fourth son, Charles W, was born about 23 May, and died 18 August, 1874. His cause of death was also cholera infantum. While having two children die the same day of the same disease might indicate contagion, in fact, this was a noncontagious disease, usually occurring in summer or autumn. It was common among the poor and in hand-fed babies. These babies were often fed mixtures of bread or flour and water, sometimes with cow’s milk which might be infected or vitamin deficient. The later development of nutritionally balanced food and proper disinfection in milk production and baby bottles greatly reduced infant mortality. A fifth son, apparently not named, was stillborn on the one-year anniversary of baby Charles’ death – 18 August 1875. A sixth son was stillborn on 14 September 1876.

The Smith family lived on Larrabee Court and Albert continued his work as a mason. Because all six boys were born and died between censuses, I did not know of their existence until this group of Massachusetts death records was released. All were buried at Pine Grove Cemetery in Lynn.

The 1880 census lists Albert and Lucinda living at 7 Larrabee Street. His occupation was listed as brick mason. Sometime after the 1880 census, Albert’s niece Josie (daughter of George) came to live with them. In 1886 and 1887, they lived at #1 Stone place. Lucinda died 28 September 1887, and is buried at Pine Grove Cemetery in Lynn. Her cause of death was apoplexy, which today would probably be called a stroke. She was only 43.

A year later, on 5 September 1888, Albert married Mary Elizabeth Thompson, ex-wife of Amos Breed, and daughter of Robert Thompson and Lydia Newhall. They lived at 5 Stone Place. They were there through 1890, but by 1893, were living at 119 Holyoke. The 1894 Lynn city directory lists Albert Smith as a trustee at the South-Street Methodist Church – his adopted daughter Josie’s husband Frank Hodges was later trustee at that same church. Josie’s soon to be husband lived in the adjacent house. The 1900 census, and Lynn city directories continue to list Albert W Smith, mason, at 119 Holyoke, through the 1906 edition, which documented his death on 3 August 1905. Albert died of stomach cancer, and was buried at Pine Grove Cemetery.

Albert’s widow Mary moved to 25 Walnut street, and was listed in the city directory as late as 1919. The 1920 Lynn city directory reported that Mary died 29 April 1919. Her death certificate shows that her cause of death was malignant disease of the liver, and she was also buried at Pine Grove Cemetery.

Charles Winfield Chick 1889 – 1958

Charles Chick was born 13 November 1889 in Kittery, Maine. His parents were Caleb W Chick and Augusta Almeda Eaton, who had been married in Portsmouth, NH on 26 January 1889. In 1900, the family lived in Kittery, where Caleb worked as a coppersmith.

On 1 September 1907, Charles married Rosie M Keen in Revere, Massachusetts. Rosie was born about 1891 in Amesbury, MA, daughter of Nathaniel Keen and Rose Burcham. This was listed as the first marriage for both. Charles was a resident of Biddeford, ME, occupation spindle straitner (sic). Rose was “at home”.

Charles enlisted in the US Navy Reserve on 9 August 1909. The 1910 census lists Charles with other crew members of the USS Hancock, and says that he has been married 3 years. His occupation appears to be “coal passer”. The census is recorded in Kings County, New York, so perhaps his ship was in port there at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. I have not yet been able to Rose Chick in the 1910 census, nor in any subsequent vital records.

Charles’ later pension application names his ships – they are in alphabetical order, so I am not sure exactly when he was on which ship. The USS Camden was a cargo ship, then submarine tender. The Constellation was a sloop-of-war that pre-dates the Civil War. During WW1, it was a training ship. The Hancock was a transport ship. The Rappahannock served in the North Atlantic, delivering animals, such as horses and cattle, to the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe. The Topeka had seen action in the Spanish American War, then was assigned as a station ship at Portsmouth NH. The ship also served there as a prison ship, then was recommissioned and moved briefly to New York, then back to Portsmouth to serve as a training ship during WW1. The Southery was originally a collier, but was converted to a prison ship, and was in the Portsmouth NH area from about 1903 to 1922.  On 13 September, 1911, Charles received an honorable discharge from USNR. He reenlisted on 6 Apr 1917.

On 6 May 1919, Charles married Loretta E Anderson, in Biddeford, ME. She was born about 1895 in Saint Johns, New Brunswick, the daughter of Charles H Anderson and Mary J Sinclair. This record is somewhat confusing as it lists Caleb and Almeda as residents of Brooklyn, NH, but lists Charles as born in Brooklyn, NH. I suspect that Brooklyn NY was his place of residence, as he was still with the USNR at the time. The occupations for the groom and bride were not listed. Charles received a second honorable discharge on 14 June 1919.

The 1920 census lists Charles Chick, and Mrs. Charles Chick, living in Portsmouth, NH, next door to his father and other family members. Charles was a machinist, although I cannot read the company name. The 1920 city directory also lists them, living at 502 Market. The 1923 Lynn MA city directory lists a Charles and Laura Chick living at 62 Spencer, but also lists a Charles W Chick, no wife listed, machinist, at 311 Summer in Lynn. I am not convinced that this Laura and Charles are the same couple, but more likely the machinist Charles W Chick is the right person. Coincidentally, Mrs. Hilda Wizard was also listed in the 1923 Lynn city directory at 311 Sumner. The reverse directory lists this as a lodging house run by Annie Thomas.

On 2 May 1923, Charles married Hilda J (Beasley) Wizard, in Maine. The index does not list the parents of the couple, nor occupations. Hilda was the daughter of George H Beasley and Lilly Barradell, and was born in Australia (her parents were both born in England.) Hilda had previously been married to John Walter Wizard (also known as Hamidas (or Hormidas) Wizard. I do not know if she was widowed or divorced. Hilda had three children from her previous marriage: Hilda Jane, Evelyn Alma, and Homidas (who might have died young.) Charles and Hilda had three daughters together. Geneva was born in 1925. Two other daughters were born after Geneva, but may still be living, so are not listed here. Charles’ military record lists a third discharge date of 27 October, 1927. It is unclear whether he extended his second enlistment, or had another re-enlistment.

From the New Castle News, New Castle, PA, 29 Apr 1929 – page 1 and 2: ACCUSES HUSBAND OF HAVING OTHER WIVES LYNN, Mass April 29 Pleading not guilty to a charge of polygamy, Charles Winfield Chick, 39, able seaman aboard the USS Accomac during the World War and now an every day mechanic was arraigned before Judge Ralph W Reeves in district court today and was held on $2,500 bail for a hearing May 7th. He married wife No. 4 at Youngstown, O., following a courtship which police alleged consisted chiefly of reading biblical and other quotations to the effect that if a man and a woman cannot agree after marriage he shall go to the farthest corner of the earth and find another woman and she shall likewise do the same. The quotations were inscribed on the invitation to the wedding at Youngstown, Ohio, between Chick and Miss Ethel Lishon of that city, the complaint against her husband. The quotation, according to police, was also inscribed on a license issued by a justice of the peace. The invitation was elaborately printed as for a society event, bearing besides the names of the wedding couple and guests, a half-tone photograph of Rev. Levi G. Batman, of Youngstown who performed the ceremony. Mrs. Ethel Chick said her suspicions were aroused a few weeks ago when she discovered letters indicating that besides the four wives on record Chick had wives in Pensacola, Fla., the Panama Canal Zone, Cuba, and France. Mrs. Ethel Chick was in court today and after the arraignment held a long conference with her husband. Acting on information give them by the former Youngstown girl, police had traced Chick to a home in West Lynn, where they assert they found him, holding the hand of another prospective bride and reading her the quotation inscribed on the wedding invitation of Miss Lishon. The police investigation as [?] was stated at police headquarters, revealed the following list of wives:
No. 1 – Miss Rose Keene, married at Biddeford, Me, in 1911 and divorced at Alfred, Me.
No. 2 – Miss Laura Anderson of Everett, date of wedding undetermined and her present whereabouts unknown.
No. 3 – Miss Hilda Wizard, native of New South Wales, married at Kittery, Me. In 1923. She is now living in Portsmouth, N.H., and told police she was deserted by Chick and was ready to testify against him.
No. 4 – Miss Ethel Lishon, married in Youngstown, O., May 7, 1928. She is now living here.
Since his arrest Sunday Chick has eaten nothing except beef stews ordered from a restaurant near police headquarters. He was removed to Salem jail in default of Bail.

A story printed in the Montana Standard, Butte, MT on April 30, 1929, included the following: FIVE WIVES WILL TESTIFY AGAINST PRINCE OF LOVERS – LYNN, Mass., April 29 (UP) The national convention of the “wives of Charles W Chick, 35, was set by Judge Ralph S Reeve today for May 7, at which time police expect to have five “Mrs. Chicks” on hand to support a polygamy charge against the former sailor. Chick’s bail was fixed at $2,500 at a preliminary hearing while police listed the result of his various ports [?] as follows:
No. 1 – Mrs. Rose (Keen) Chick, Biddeford, Me.
No. 2 – Mrs. Laura (Anderson) Chick, Biddeford, Me.
No. 3 – A woman whose name was withheld by police.
No. 4 – Mrs. Hilda (Wizard) Chick, Kittery, Me.
No. 5 – Mrs. Ethel (Leyshon) Chick, Lynn.
Chick described himself as a former chief engineer in the navy. One of his “wives” spoke of him as “the prince of all lovers.”

The Ogden Standard-Examiner, of Ogden, Utah, printed the outcome of the charges on 23 May 1929. SAILOR CONFESSES TO SEVEN WIVES SALEM, Mass May 23 (AP) Charles W Chick, a sailor and possessor of seven wives, pleaded guilty to polygamy in superior criminal court here Wednesday and was sentenced to a year in the house of correction. He was arrested on complaint of wife No. 7, who said he had failed to support her. Two of his seven wives testified against him. Mrs. Ethel Leyson Chick said she married him in Youngstown, O., a year ago. Mrs. Hilda Wizard of Portsmouth, N.H., testified she left Chick because he was cruel to her. The other wives named in court were: Loretta Chick of Pasadena, Cal.; Rose Keene Chick and Laura Anderson Chick, both of Biddeford, Me.; Yvonne Chick of Paris, France, and Leona Chick of Pensacola, Fla. 

I did not locate a record for the marriage to Leona but did locate a marriage of Charles W Chick on 27 February 1927 in Tampa, to a Gertrude Whitten. The index doesn’t list parents’ names, occupations, or ages, but one has to wonder…especially since I did not find a household in the 1930 census for this for this couple. Chick was out of prison in time to be counted in the 1930 census in Kennebunk, Maine, with his mother and members of her extended family. Charles reported himself divorced, no occupation listed.

On 30 March, 1931, Charles married Myrtle Brown in Portsmouth, NH. This index entry does not list occupations, ages, or parents for either.

On 29 August 1932, Charles applied for a military pension. This index card is hard to read, but lists his ship’s names: Camden, Constellation, Hancock, Rappahannock, Quail, Southery, and Topeka.

On 20 September, 1935, in Portsmouth, NH, Charles married Florence D Myers. She was born about 1887 in Saco, Maine, daughter of Alden J Myers and Clara Jameson. The groom reported he was widowed, the bride divorced. He was a machinist, she was a reporter. This was listed as the groom’s fourth marriage, although I count five previous wives (Rosie, Loretta, Hilda, Ethel and Myrtle plus of course Yvonne and Leona and maybe even Gertrude).

In the 1940 census, Charles was living in Bath, Maine, boarding with Mildred Landers. Both were listed as divorced, and both reported that in 1935, they were living in Boston. Charles was a lathe machinist, engaged in shipbuilding. Mildred did not have an occupation listed. She is likely the ex wife of John Landers, as they were listed in the Boston directory in 1935 (41 Mall, Roxbury). Her middle initial was E, which matches the application for headstone.
Sometime after 1940, Charles married someone named Mildred, and perhaps it was his landlady listed in the 1940 census. The 1944 Portland city directory lists them at 40 Melbourne, employed by NESCo. In 1949 they were in Bath, ME, where he was a machinist with WH Co, residing at 104 Academy.  The 1950 Biddeford city directory lists Charles W and Mildred E Chick residing at 27 Elm. Occupation was superintendent at SLS, but I don’t know what that company was.

Charles died 11 September 1958, and Mildred Chick applied for a military headstone for him. He was buried at Sandy Point Cemetery, in Maine.

I do not know what became of most of the wives. Hilda remarried twice more, and had two more daughters. Mildred outlived Charles, as she made the request for his military headstone. Other than his daughters with Hilda, I found no reference to other children.

Diadamia Amelia Taylor Gould 1873 – ? after 1940

Diadamia Taylor was born 1 February 1873 in Ayesford, Nova Scotia, the 8th child and first daughter of George William Taylor and Diadamia Hodges.  She joined older brothers John Howard, George Wesley, Fletcher C, Archibald C, Robert Whitfield (who died as an infant), Robert Freeman, and Richard Washington.  Her sister Martha was born 2 ½ years later.  Diadamia’s father was a farmer, and Baptist, but according to the 1881 census, her mother and all the children were Methodists.  They lived in the South part of Aylesford Township.

Diadamia’s father George died 25 January, 1882, when she was only 9.  She was listed as an heir of his, with middle initial “A”.

On 28 January, 1890, in Northborough, Massachusetts, Amelia Taylor, age 17, domestic, of Millville Nova Scotia, married Leonard Gould, 28, laborer, also of Millville.  Both were residents of Westborough MA at the time of the marriage.  Amelia’s parents were George and Damia (Hodges) Taylor and I am sure that Amelia is Diadamia.   She was actually a few days short of her 17th birthday.  Leonard’s sister Anna Laura had married Amelia’s brother Robert four years earlier.

James Leonard Gould was born about 1862 in Millville, NS, son of David Gould and Catherine Murphy.  David was a farmer, and the family was Methodist, according to the 1871 census.  In 1881, James worked as a servant for the family of Jonathan C Hodges, Amelia’s uncle.

Leonard and Amelia had three children, all born in Westborough, MA.  Ida Ramond was born 13 June 1892.  James Leonard Jr, was born 28 August 1894 but died five months later of bronchitis.  Milledge Leonard was born 8 Aug, 1898.  Leonard (the father) was always listed as a laborer, but the birth records did not specify the type of work.

The 1900 census lists the family at 26 Florence Street in Marlborough, MA.  Leonard’s occupation is listed as shoemaker (bottomer), and he listed his birthday as June 1864, which is two years off the age from the 1871 census.

It appears that Leonard and Amelia divorced sometime in the next few years.  In 1910, Amelia was listed as divorced, living at 54 Mechanic Street in Marlborough.  She had a boarder, but no family members living with her.  She worked as a stitcher in a shoe factory.  Daughter Ida had married Freeman George Ferguson in Halifax, NS in 1907, when she was just 15.  Ida’s son George was born ten months later, but died at age 6 weeks.  The 1910 census shows Ida and Freeman in Marlborough, where he worked as a sausage maker in a sausage factory, and Ida was a folder in a shoe factory.  Amelia’s son Milledge was 11, and boarding with sisters Fannie and Hattie Jennings in Thompson, Connecticut.  I do not know of any connection between Amelia and the Jennings sisters, who were sewers in a woolen mill.  Leonard moved back to Nova Scotia, and in 1911, was boarding with Aaron Hodges, his wife’s cousin.

The 1915 New York State Census lists Amelia’s son Milledge, age 15, as a prisoner at the New York House of Refuge, a juvenile reformatory on Randall Island, near Manhattan.  The “permanent address” listed on the census is 54 Mechanic Street, Marlborough, MA.  His occupation was listed as “school”.  Looking through the other names on the sheet, it appears that those 16 and under were in school, while the 17- and 18-year-olds had jobs or training such as bakery, waiter, tailoring, plumbing, or office work.  Milledge was the only person on that page not from New York, except for one from New Jersey.  I wonder how he ended up incarcerated so far from home, at such a young age.  Early stories from the reformatory dating back to the 1860s tell of a boy being whipped to the point that he died a few days later.  I hope that this reformatory had itself reformed by 1915.  It was still in use in the early 1930s, but the Island has been turned over to the NY Parks and the institution closed.

In 1919, Amelia’s ex-husband Leonard, calling himself a widower, married Grace Porter (widow of Ingersol Lightfoot).  They had a daughter Delia, born in 1920, and a stillborn daughter Jennie, born in 1923.  Grace married again in 1933, identifying herself as a widow, so Leonard apparently died between 1923 and 1933.

In 1920, Amelia lived at 98 Mechanic Street in Marlborough, boarding with an older lady.  She listed herself as divorced, and was a stitcher at a shoe factory.  I have not yet located Amelia’s daughter Ida in the 1920 census, but I suspect that she was separated or divorced by then, as Freeman and their son John were living in Nova Scotia with Freeman’s father, according to the 1921 Canada census.  Amelia’s son Milledge was living at 67 Fairmount in Marlborough, with his wife Margaret.  Both were shoemakers.  I have not further identified Margaret.

According to city directories, some time between 1925 and 1929, Amelia moved to Newark New Jersey.  She lived at 428 Plane, and listed herself as widow of Leonard J.  In today’s terms, it would have been more correct to say ex-spouse, but it is also possible that he had really died by 1929.  Amelia did not have an occupation listed.  Her son, Milledge, shoemaker, and daughter Mrs. Ida Ferguson also lived at 428 Plane.

In 1930, Amelia was listed in the census living in Newark.  The household included son Milledge, daughter Ida and her son John, and four unrelated boarders.  Milledge was a waiter in a restaurant and was listed as married, although no wife was listed.  Ida listed herself as widowed, but was actually divorced.  She worked as an operator at a dress factory (probably operating machines, not phones) and her son John, age 18, was a mechanic at a dress factory.

It appears that Milledge and Margaret might have had a daughter, Pearl, born about 1924 in Marlborough.  The 1930 census lists a person matching this description living at the Protestant Foster Home in Newark.  She is listed as “half orphan”.  This building was erected in 1875 and is now on the National Register of Historic Places.  The 1893 Newark City Directory says it “receives orphans, half orphans, and friendless children.”   A blog which shares stories of former residents says that (as of 1940) the life was very structured but children were never mistreated.  They attended school, church, did chores, and had play time.  I hope that Pearl found the living conditions to be as benevolent.

In 1940, Amelia’s family was together again, still living at 428 Plane.  Amelia was a housekeeper at a rooming house.  Milledge was a government worker (laborer) on a wood-cutting project, and his daughter Pearl lived with them (no occupation).  Ida’s son John and his wife Laura were also in the household.  John was a government worker (laborer) on the state highway.  Ida Ferguson was a packer in a factory that made drugs and creams.

I have not yet found death records for Amelia, her daughter Ida, nor her son Millege.  Ida’s ex-husband Freeman Ferguson apparently stayed in the Marlborough MA area, and died there in June 1967.  Their son John died in 1996 in Florida, but I don’t know what happened to John’s wife Laura.  I don’t know what happened to Millege’s wife Margaret, or their daughter Pearl.

Marie Clapasson Mack

Our genealogy society responds to requests for help relating to research in our area.  Here’s one I worked on recently.

The request for information about Marie was a simple one that came through our website. Gérard from France was looking for an ancestor who came to the US in 1895, and who married in 1907 a man named Edward Mack, barber. He had their information from the 1910 census, and found Ed’s burial information in the on-line Missoula Cemetery interment records, but Marie was not with him. Gérard’s request was simply to know how to find out when and where Marie died, if in Missoula.

The answer was easy to find – a trip to the library to check the cemetery index and biographical sheets from the Missoulian vital records index. First, I checked a few other resources. I confirmed that Marie or Mary Mack was not listed at the Missoula City Cemetery (although Ed was), nor in Find-A-Grave (many at Saint Mary’s are listed.) Knowing that the Missoula Cemetery office has more than just the burial information for some interments, I sent an e-mail to the office to see if there were any clues in Ed’s record that might lead to Marie. I found the image for Marie’s marriage record to Ed at FamilySearch.org, and was surprised to see that it was an interracial marriage, performed by a Justice of the Peace, not in the Catholic church. Mary’s name was recorded as Chapasson, not previously married, and Ed was divorced.

At Missoula Public Library, I easily found Mary Mack in the cemetery index books, and she was at Saint Mary’s. The bio sheet included the date, page, and column number for the newspaper items. With that, I was able to go directly to her death notices in the newspaper microfilm. I saved the images to a USB drive, so they were easy to e-mail to Gérard.
Gérard shared that he had a Canada border crossing record where Marie Clapasson named her contact in Missoula. I found that record on Ancestry, and it appears that the person listed was Mrs. Gleim. Mary Gleim is a notorious figure in Missoula history, known for, among other things, operating brothels. Her addresses, and those of Marie (from city directories) put them living adjacent to each other, in the downtown area of Missoula. I don’t know what type of relationship existed between Marie Clapasson and Mary Gleim. I found no arrest records for Marie during a check of historic jail records at UM’s Mansfield Library Special Collections, nor at the new Missoula County Records Center. Gérard later said that he was aware of the possible connection to Mrs. Gleim. The staff at MCRC also checked their naturalization records for Marie, but didn’t find her. Perhaps she claimed automatic citizenship based on her marriage to Ed Mack.

I went to Saint Mary’s cemetery where a staff member escorted me to Mary Mack’s burial place. She has no headstone. She probably had a flat “paver” with her name. Probing with a large metal spike didn’t reveal it, and it may have disintegrated after 99 years. I took special note of the location, then used Google Maps (satellite view) zoomed in all the way, plus street view (Marie was close to the fence) and was able to give Gérard a virtual visit to the burial site of his great grandmother.
I received an e-mail back from the Missoula Cemetery. They found no information about Marie Clapasson Mack with her husband’s record, but the burial record for Ed’s second wife Callie indicated that she had been murdered!

I visited the courthouse to get death certificates for Marie, Callie, and Ed, then went back to the library for the bio sheets for Callie and Ed. The newspaper reported that Callie had been found with a bullet wound in her head, and a gun in her hand. The initial thought was suicide, but investigators ruled that out. A female associate and a former male guest at Callie’s boarding house were initially charged with Callie’s death, I read that Ed Mack was charged a few days later with killing his wife. The newspaper vital records index did not have the date of Ed’s trial. Back at MCRC, I was able to read the trial record. Sadly, it only listed the charges, the list of jurors, and the list of witnesses (which included the two people originally charged in the murder). The jury instructions included explanations of first and second degree murder, manslaughter, premeditation, and other information the jurors would need for the case. The file included no list of evidence and no testimony or law enforcement reports, but a final sheet of paper that said Ed was acquitted. His death notice in The Missoulian said that Ed had come to Missoula to play baseball. Perhaps he was part of one of the local company teams. He worked as a horse trainer in his earlier days, and was a barber until he became too ill to work. The notice referred to the murder of Callie, saying that he was acquitted after a lengthy trial, and vowed to find the real killers.

Feeling the full story of Marie’s husband wouldn’t be known without more information about the trial, I used the microfilmed Missoulian for February 11, 12, and 13, 1925 to review the coverage of event. The reporter commented on the large number of people who came to watch. The State was seeking the death penalty if Ed Mack was found guilty. The coroner and a doctor ruled out the possibility that the wounds could have been self inflicted, as she had three bullet wounds, anyone of which could have been fatal, and the body had no powder burns. Prosecution witnesses reported hearing three gunshots, and a voice they identified as Mack’s, in the area of the woodshed behind Columbia Rooms, Callie’s business. However, some of these witness statements were not consistent with their previous testimony at the earlier inquest, and some were specifically contradicted. Apparently in response to criticism about the quality of the character of some of those witnesses, the prosecutor was quoted as saying, “One can’t get witnesses from a Sunday school for a crime that is committed in a house of ill-repute.” Defense witnesses testified seeing Ed at his barber shop during the time in question, and character witnesses described him as a good citizen. In the end, the jury deliberated only 40 minutes before acquitting Ed Mack of the murder, to the approval of the large crowd which had attended the trial.

I was glad to have the opportunity to work on this research request. Since my personal research doesn’t include this geographical area, it was fun to learn what wonderful resources we have available right in our own home town. And most of all, the staff at every stop was friendly and helpful.

George W Ayers and Maria D Hawkins

George W Ayers was born 2 Jun 1821 in Wakefield, NH. I have not yet identified his parents. One city directory showed Andrew J Ayers living with George. Andrew is the right age to be his brother, and Andrew’s death record names his father as Joseph. In one census record, an older woman named Olive Ayers was living with Andrew. Those names might be clues to George’s parents.

Maria D Hawkins was born about September 1826 in Tamworth, NH, daughter of Cornelius D Hawkins and Sarah Winkley. The Hawkins family lived in Tamworth in 1830, and in 1840 was in nearby Albany. (Town boundaries were changing in those years, so they may have lived in two different towns without moving.) Conway NH town tax records show that Cornelius was in Conway by 1844.

I have not yet found a marriage record for Maria and George, but they were probably married about 1846, as their first child, daughter Margelia (Gelia) was born in Portsmouth NH in 1848. I have not yet located the family in the 1850 census.

Two more children were born: Alfred Winslow Ayers in 1852, and George Herbert Ayers in 1856. The 1857 Portsmouth city directory is the first paper record I have for the family. George was listed at 29 Hanover street, employed at W. Simes & Co. Andrew as mentioned above lived at the same residence, and this was the Ayers home for a couple generations. The 1860 census lists the family, George working as a laborer. His real estate was valued at $1000, and his personal property at $500. The 1867 city directory lists George as a sexton, a position he held for 50 years.

In 1870, George’s occupation was listed as teamster, with personal property valued at $400. Maria’s occupation was “keeping house”. The household included Winslow and George H, as well as daughter Margelia A, and her new husband, Flavin Berri, a clerk in a store. Ancestry has a good collection of city directories for Portsmouth during these years, and George was listed every other year (probably that’s how often they were published) as sexton and later listed as associated with the North Church – Congregational. In 1875, the Ayers home was listed in the business section of the directory as a boarding house. Son Herbert was sometimes listed as an engineer, but I’m not sure what kind. Later he was a barber and hair dresser.

The Ayers family probably kept a couple milk cows. As reported in the Independent Statesman (Concord NH) on 13 April 1876, George W Ayers, of Portsmouth, last season pastured a yearling heifer, in Greenland, but when the fall came she could not be caught. The farmer set his shepherd dog to catch her, but he only succeeded in driving her from the pasture, and she has wandered about the woods between Greenland and Stratham all winter, subsisting mainly on browsing trees. For several weeks she has been known to be in the vicinity of a farm in Stratham, and has been fed in the woods; but though coming near the farm several times with the cattle, she could not be toled into the yard or building, and she was only captured finally last week, by the farmer building a shed or trap over the spot where he was accustomed to leave her hay in the woods, with a door to drop by her removing its support as she fed, when he climbed to the top and dropped a rope down over her horns. She is quite thin in flesh, but surprisingly tame and gentle considering her escapade.   (I had to look it up – toled means enticed.)

In 1880, the household on Hanover Street included George, still listed as a teamster, with Maria keeping house. Son Herbert was a barber. Son-in-law Floren Barri was a soap chandler (manufacturer) and he and Gelia had a daughter, Bertha. The final member of the household was Maria Fuller, most certainly the daughter of Maria Hawkins Ayers’ sister, Eliza Hawkins Fuller. Her “relationship” was servant, as was her occupation, so she probably helped in the boarding house operations. The city directories through the 1880s continued to list George as sexton, and in 1888, the occupation of mail carrier was added through 1894.

George and Maria’s daughter Gelia died 30 Dec 1885 of chronic mania at the state hospital in Worcester and was buried at Harmony Grove Cemetery. Her husband remarried 10 years later, and died in 1913 in Massachusetts.  (Their daughter Bertha married William Entwistle, and died in Portsmouth in 1932.)

George and Maria’s son Alfred died 23 Feb 1891. The cause of death was hard to read, but probably was cerebritis, an infection of the brain. He was buried at Harmony Grove. Alfred had married Nellie Randall of Gosport (Isles of Shoals) and their daughter Ethel had married Patrick Coffee, then William Simmons.

Maria D (Hawkins) Ayers died 8 Oct 1891 of pneumonia, and is buried at Harmony Grove. Her death record lists her as the daughter of Alpheus Hawkins and Sarah A Winkley. I believe that this record incorrectly named her father, and that it should say Cornelius Hawkins. I found no other record linking Alpheus and Sarah. She is listed as the mother of Cornelius’ other three children – Eliza Jane, Sarah Ann, and Andrew Jackson. The only other Alpheus in the Tamworth area older than Maria was only 13 when she was born. He might be Cornelius’ brother, as they were living next to each other according to an early census record, but Alpheus married Betsey Harriman, not Sarah A Winkley. The death record is an index card copied from the Portsmouth town records, and a librarian at the Portsmouth library confirmed that Alpheus was recorded on the original town report. I hope that any readers with either supporting or contradicting information about Maria will share that with me.

George and Maria’s son George Herbert died d 5 Feb 1895 and is buried at Harmony Grove. His cause of death was “general paresis” which was a neuropsychiatric disorder affecting the brain. He had been married to May Morton, but I have found no record of children for them.

George (senior) may have retired by 1897, as the city directory for that year lists him at the same address, but no occupation. An item in the 19 Oct 1898 Portsmouth Herald reported that Mr George W Ayers of Hanover street will leave next month for Southern Pines, NC to pass the winter. He will be accompanied by Mrs. W T Entwistle, his grand-daughter. I don’t know what George’s connection was with Southern Pines, a community in the center of the state.

In 1900, George lived at same address, living with Bertha (daughter of Gelia) and William Entwistle. A boarder with the family was Elizabeth M Ayers b Sep 1865, but I don’t know how she is connected to George. The city directories continued to list George in 1901 and 1903.

George died 4 Dec 1907 from arteriosclerosis, and is buried at Harmony Grove. His death record did not name his parents. However, his death was noted in a California newspaper. Los Angeles Herald, Volume 35, Number 77, 18 December 1907 – Portsmouth NH Dec 17 George W Ayers, 86, died recently at his home on Hanover street. He was the oldest member of New Hampshire Lodge of Odd Fellows, having joined that organization May 31, 1848. He was for a half-century sexton of the North Congregational church.

Who Is Sarah Winkley?

The first person I blogged about several years ago was Sarah Ann Hawkins, daughter of Cornelius Hawkins.  Having a copy of an original New Hampshire marriage record (not the index cards) showing that Cornelius Hawkins had married Sally Brown, I had assumed that she was the mother of his children.  After a lot of searching, I found Sarah Ann’s death record – the index card – and it named her mother as Sarah Winkley.  I also found the record for her sister Eliza, which again listed the mother as Sarah Winkley.  I haven’t yet identified their older sister who was listed in the 1840 census – but younger brother Andrew’s 2nd marriage information names his mother as Sarah W.

Who is Sarah Winkley?

Some on-line trees on Ancestry list her as the daughter of William Winkley and Mary Winkley, being born 22 Feb 1798 in Barrington, NH, dying 7 Dec 1871 in Portsmouth NH. 

Here’s what I know – I have a photocopy of an old marriage record that says that on 5 December 1825, Mr. Cornelius Hawkins and Miss Sally Brown, both of Tamworth, were married.  The record doesn’t name parents.  The “Miss” in the record implies that this is Sally’s first marriage. 

The 1830 census lists Cornelius Hawkins age between 20-30, a woman of the same age, and two females under the age of 10 (presumed to be Eliza and her unknown sister.)

The 1840 census lists Cornelius Hawkins age 30-40, a male under 5 (Andrew) a female 30-40 (his wife), two girls 10-15 (Eliza and ?) and one girl under 5 (Sarah Ann).

The 1850 census names all family members and lists Cornelius as 45, Sally as 50, Sarah as 19, and Andrew as 12.  I know that daughter Eliza was married in 1848, but don’t know what happened to the other daughter.  Sally is sometimes a nickname for Sarah.  Is this Sally the same person as Sarah Winkley? 

From later records, I learned that Eliza Hawkins was born in 1829, so for Sarah Winkley to be her mother, she would most likely have married Cornelius between the 1825 marriage of Sally Brown, and Eliza’s birth. 

The NH vital records show an index card saying that Cornelius and Sally Brown were married 2 March 1860.  The name of the justice of the peace is the same as the original record.  I suspect that the person tasked in 1905 with copying the original information from town records to the state index cards simply erred and (almost) wrote the original date of the recording of the marriage (29 March) and mixed up the year (1826 vs 1860). 

The 1860 census lists Cornelius, Sally, and Andrew, plus daughter Sarah Ann and her new husband and child (which should have been Josephine but they recorded as John.)

The 1870 census lists Cornelius but now calls his wife Mary.  Through the prior census records, his spouse Sally has always been a few years older, but Mary is now listed a year younger.  I don’t know if this is just a discrepancy caused by the passage of time, or if this indicates a different wife for Cornelius. 

I did not find Cornelius and wife in the 1880 census, so I am guessing that they died before it was taken.  I also didn’t find any other Cornelius living in the Tamworth/Albany/Conway area, so believe that the above-listed records all apply to one person. 

CD Hawkins’ headstone is in Portsmouth, NH, and says born in 1805, died in 1800.  It also says Sarah, his wife, born 1800, died 1880.  They are buried with Eliza Hawkins Fuller and family, so I am confident that CD is Cornelius.   I have not been able to find death records for Cornelius or Sarah.  They may have died elsewhere and been buried here as part of Eliza’s family plot. 

Back to Sarah Winkley.  If she is the one listed as dying in 1871, why is her headstone off by nine years?  I know “written in stone” doesn’t make it true, so was this an error made by the stone carver? Or is the record for a different person.

An index of NH births at FamilySearch.org does list the Sarah who was born in 1798, daughter of William and Mary, although the associated image is the index card, not an original record.   The same website has the 1871 death record.  However, if she was Cornelius’ wife, her death record should have listed her as Sarah Hawkins, not Sarah Winkley.  The record shows her as single – other options available on the card were married, widowed, or divorced, and since single was written in, most likely this Sarah Winkley was NOT the spouse of Cornelius Hawkins. 

The parents of this Sarah Winkley died before the 1850 census, so I was not able to find them in a family group.  However, the 1860 and 1870 census shows a Sarah of the correct age, living in the Buzzell family in Barrington.  A little prowling around Ancestry indicates that Sarah had a sister Ann (aka Nancy) who married a Buzzell.  These records are what I would expect to find for a Sarah Winkley who never married, which is what is indicated by her death record.   Finally, the best evidence.  on FamilySearch.org, I found the will for William Winkley, from 1845.  He named his daughters by their married name, but Sarah was called Winkley, indicating she wasn’t married.  The will also described an arrangement William Winkley made in 1840 with his son-in-law Jeremiah Buzzell, for Sarah’s care.  Having made this arrangement for a 40-year-old daughter, I suspect she may have had a mental or physical disabilitity that ruled out the possibility that she would marry and have a family of her own.  Final proof that the daughter of William was not Mrs. Cornelius Hawkins.

So who is the right Sarah Winkley? I have proven that the Sarah daughter of William as shown on  the trees on Ancestry is not the correct person.  I have ruled her out, but that doesn’t bring me any closer to identifying my third-great-grandmother beyond just her name. 

Next step – contact the three tree owners on Ancestry to share the above info (and hope they correct the record) and keep watching for new databases that might help sort this out.

My Presentation to Montana Library Association, 18 April 2013

[Basic, beginning research, and free Internet resources to assist the researcher.]

How popular is Genealogy? Hard to measure, with questionable statistics, being an individual activity, no superstars, but commercial sites, blogs, and personal family history websites are growing in number. It used to be common more with people who had the time and resources to travel to do the research. Libraries of all sizes have local history and genealogy sections of all sizes, and if your library provides Internet access for patrons, librarians can help them research their families using Internet resources. I’ll present these concepts as though you are the beginning researcher, and you can share whatever you find helpful with your library customers.

Some people think genealogy is a way to prove that they are descended from, or related to, someone important. Most of us are not – we are more likely to find some small black sheep in the family than we are to find a president in the pedigree. Be prepared to find unwed mothers and early babies. Accept that you may find someone with a criminal history. Your race may not be what you thought. Just enjoy the pursuit.

Assess what you already have. Look through letters, bibles, and photographs. Record what you know, starting with yourself, then your parents, then their parents. Don’t forget the siblings in each generation. Talk to the family elders. Ask them about family history – some will be more willing to talk than others. Pay attention at family reunions. Ask if they mind if you record stories.
http://genealogy.about.com/cs/oralhistory/a/interview.htm
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohlths/interview2.htm

KEEPING RECORDS – It’s hard for me to believe, but people did do research and keep records BC (before computers.) Now there are many software programs that keep electronic records organized. One free version is Personal Ancestral File (PAF) available from FamilySearch.org – the LDS site. It can be downloaded directly from the site. Another popular name is Family Tree Maker (FTM), which is affiliated with Ancestry.com. It is not free, but in the past it has come with a free subscription to Ancestry, so it might be a good deal. These are the only two I have personally used – I don’t have personal knowledge of the other programs. https://familysearch.org/products – Free download of Personal Ancestral File http://www.familytreemaker.com/ – Family Tree Maker for PC or Mac, or Google “genealogy software” for other options.

The first basic form most commonly used is a pedigree chart. Most are 4 generation, and will list the person, his parents, his grandparents, and great grandparents. The chart commonly records the name, and date and location for birth, marriage, death (BMD). These are handy for note taking, for later entry into a software program if used. The other most common form is the family group sheet (FGS). It lists the father and a minimum of his birth, marriage, death, and his parents. It lists the same information for the mother. Then it lists the children and information, and their spouses. A person would be listed as a child on the FGS of his parents, then be listed as the parent on his own FGS, then be listed as the parent of the parent on one of the grandchildren’s FGS. (This is why genealogy software is good –it will generate these reports, neatly typed. They will also re-order the children, if you happen to get them out of order.) If you don’t have genealogy software, you can get blank genealogy forms from the internet.
http://www.cs.williams.edu/~bailey/genealogy/
http://www.ancestry.com/trees/charts/ancchart.aspx

I started out keeping paper records in 3-ring binders – one for the father’s side, one for the mother’s side of the family. It didn’t take long to have to double that, one book for each grandparent. I haven’t investigated in detail, but I suspect that genealogist contribute greatly to the economy by buying all those binders and sheet protectors. Tip – Keep your original records in a safe place. Scan them and make copies for everyday use. Use archival-safe products (paper, sheet protectors, etc). Make back-up disks of your records. Send a copy to a cousin, in another town, even if they don’t care about genealogy. Tell them to keep it safe for you. Don’t know how often to update that off-site copy? If you lost all your records, how much of the newest information would you be willing to have to research again, without shedding tears? It’s a personal decision.

BASICS  Record your sources – easy to say, but it does take a few minutes. It will save you time later. Record where you have already searched and NOT found something – it will save looking there again. You can simply record in a notebook, in your genealogy software, or use one of the free Research Log forms. Record dates in the international style – 01 July 1900. When recording locations, include the county name. It is suggested that state names should be written out, and the country should be included, as an aid for non US researchers, when you share information.  When recording a woman’s name, use the maiden name. Junior and Senior are not normally recorded in the records although those are clues to the name of another family member. Sometimes, those terms were used to distinguish between two people of the same name, but differing in age – such as grandfather/grandson, or uncle/nephew. Expect to find variations of spellings of names. They may have been incorrectly recorded, or become Americanized. Some families alternated using the first name, and the middle name as the first name. Expect to find variations of ages when tracking a person through records. My great great grandmother only aged about 7 years in each census decade. For birth dates, the family might have claimed the baby was younger so as to fit in with the date of marriage. At a wedding, the bride might have been listed as older than she really was, if she was particularly young.

Best records are the original records – BMD – birth, marriage, death. If these documents are not in the family’s possession, search for copies of those records. These vital records are archived at different levels, depending on the state. In the east, they are most commonly held at the city hall. Farther west, events were recorded at the county level. Some states have repositories for vital statistics. Access to records can vary, too, from not available at all, to posted on line, free for the taking. Remember that you should look for a copy of the original, and not an index of those records. Any time someone copies information from one place to another, there is the opportunity for error. Google for the city or county offices – they may have posted information on how to order records.

INTERNET RESOURCES FOR RESEARCH In the past decade, the amount of genealogical information on the Internet has grown greatly. Some jurisdictions post actual images (Washington, Nova Scotia), some have an index (Massachusetts). The years covered varies. Unlike books, Internet resources can changes. If it is of interest, save it, as the information might not always be there. If you post records on the Internet, do NOT put information about live people on line, at least not without their permission. Tip -Set up a Genealogy folder in your Internet Favorites – and use it to keep track of the good websites you find.

Family Search –https://familysearch.org/ This site has all free databases courtesy of the LDS Church. Most records can be searched by location, name, and dates. Some records must be browsed, but most are organized by location. Many records are only part of an index, but many others have the actual images. New databases are being added all the time. This site has BMDs plus federal and some state census records, and even probate records. FS also has on-line training for all areas of research, from basics to technology.

Ancestry at http://www.ancestry.com is a subscription site. It has historical records (BMD), publications, and family trees (posted by users). It also has all the federal census records and about 36 state censuses. Publications include newspapers, city directories, and school yearbooks. Ancestry also has immigration records. Ancestry is free to use within some libraries, and at Family History Centers affiliated with LDS churches. Rootsweb at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/ is affiliated with Ancestry, but information is free.

Census Finder at http://www.censusfinder.com/ tells where to find census records. These are the most commonly used records to establish family groups, ages, occupations, residences. Use the “Census Questions” option to find out what questions were asked each census year. You are unlikely to find the original records for viewing, but scanned images are available online and on microfilm. The census was taken every 10 years, recorded by counties. This is why it is important to record the county as well as town. The first national census was in 1790. In the early years, only the head of household was listed by name. The rest of the family was documented by noting how many of each gender, in an age group (i.e. age 5-10) lived in the family. In 1850, the census started listing every name, but not the relationship. The woman living with the man was probably his wife, but could also have been his sister who came to the family to care for the kids. You just can’t tell from the census. In 1880, relationships were recorded. The 1890 census was almost entirely destroyed by a fire at the archives. The 1900 lists the person’s month and year of birth. The later census records asked “age at first marriage” and then “years married”. This can be helpful to establish whether this is first or second marriage. Some census takers were helpful and wrote “M2” to indicate a second marriage. Another question asked of women was number of children born, number of children still living. Other common information collected is where born, where parents were born, military service, occupation, immigration information. When looking at census records, check the page before and the page after, to look for familiar names. Families tended to leave near each other. In towns, the address was part of the census record and is recorded on the left. Tip – Go online and download blank census forms for each year. Look at the column headings – they will be easier to read than the actual images. Some people transcribe from the images onto the forms, because it may be easier to read when referring back to the forms. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/census/freecensusforms.htm is another website with free forms.
The latest census released is 1940 which came out in April 2012. Canada and Great Britain census records are available. They are on the “ones” – 1851, 1861, etc. 1911 is the latest.

IMMIGRATION The Ellis Island site is at http://www.ellisisland.org/ and the Castle Garden site is at http://www.castlegarden.org/ Those sites are sometimes hard to use. Another site at http://stevemorse.org/ellis2/ellisgold.html will provide links to the same information. Use the drop-down list to select Ellis Island or Castle Garden.

OBITUARIES – Obituaries vary greatly in the amount of information provided. Some are mere death announcements. Other include great clues such as family members (watch for “preceded in death by” and “survived by” for clues to their death dates.) Spouses of siblings and children may also be listed. Obituaries are a secondary record. The primary record would be a death certificate (which can also have errors, but are at least considered official.)

BURIAL RECORDS Missoula City Cemetery http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/index.aspx?NID=202 These interment records are only for the City cemetery. Other cemeteries would have their own records. The cemetery sexton maintains files that may have more information. Find-A-Grave at http://www.findagrave.com has user-contributed burial records. Some records include links to other family members. Some include obituaries or short biographies. Searches can be filtered by state and county. Interment at http://www.interment.net/ is another site of user-contributed burial records.

CITY DIRECTORIES – Information collected can vary, but usually includes the head of the household, and perhaps the spouse, with the place of employment, and the place of residence. If the head of the household disappears from one year to the next, and the wife is now listed as “widow of”, that narrows down the search for the death certificate. A directory might even list the specific date of death. In addition, directories probably have advertising. I was lucky enough to find a turn of the century advertisement for my great great grandfather George’s horse-drawn freighting business. http://www.uscitydirectories.com/ is a website that has the goal of identifying where old printed, microfilm, and online directories can be found.

TOWN REPORTS New England towns have a wonderful tradition of annual town reports, which may commonly have included an index of all the births, marriages, and deaths for the year. Finding the event listed in the town report would point you to the town hall to get a copy of the actual birth, marriage, or death record. Take the time to look through more of the report. Although we still have not found great great grandfather Barnabus’ death record, we did find that the town paid for his stay at the town farm, and paid a doctor’s bill, then a grave digger’s bill, on behalf of Barnabus. That may be the only record we ever have for his death. Use Google or some other search engine to search for town reports on line.

MILITARY RECORDS The Missoula Public Library at http://www.missoulapubliclibrary.org/ provides access to Heritage Quest, but you do need a library card ID number to log in from home. Revolutionary war pension records are available on line at Heritage Quest. Information in these records varies, but often includes the pensioner or his widow explaining his war service, her date of marriage (to establish she is eligible), their children, and their residence.
Civil war pension index can be found on line, but I have not yet found many images for the actual documents. They can be ordered from the National Archives in Washington, DC. A pay website called Fold3 has military records. WW1 draft registration forms are on line at Ancestry. These were good at recording middle names, and dates of birth although the year can be off by 1. Some versions listed next of kin, and employment. WW2 enlistment information and the “old man’s draft” cards are also on line at Ancestry. (This isn’t an advertisement for Ancestry, but since I subscribe, this is where I have found the information.)

LAND RECORDS Available on line from the Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office (GLO) are homestead records, at http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/ . Most have actual images of the final homestead award. You can send away for the full record, which may include proof of residency, naturalization records, etc. With the land description and a good map, you can find the homestead. It may be a housing development now, or perhaps is a farm still in the family. Search Land Patents by selecting the state, then the name using exact spelling (try variations.) http://www.earthpoint.us/TownshipsSearchByDescription.aspx is a website that will convert the homestead location from the Section/Township/Range location to a GPS location, and then will take you there using Google Earth if you have that installed on your computer.

WORLD GENWEB PROJECT at http://www.worldgenweb.org/ is a non-profit volunteer organization dedicated to providing genealogical and historical records. The website for the United States is at http://www.usgenweb.org/ and that site is divided by states, then by counties. Because these are all run by volunteers, the information at each local site varies.

GOOGLE at http://www.google.com/ or your favorite search engine (Dogpile, Yahoo) can lead to information about ancestors. Tip: Search also by last name first, “Woody, Frank”. Search on locations, such as “Vermont Genealogy”. Search for land records by geographic area, church records, etc.

MESSAGE BOARDS – If you google a name, you may get a hit that leads you to a message board relating to either the location you searched on, or the family name. Those are a good place to find information. Here are a few tips for posting a query of your own. In the subject line, put in meaningful information. A query like “Need information on Smith Family” will probably be glossed over by readers, whereas a query like “Seeking Parents of Joseph Smith b 1803 Ipswich MA” provides time and location enough to let the reader know if she can help this person. Use the body of the message to be specific about information sought. For example, “ Joseph m Harriet Newell, has children Albert, George, Drucilla. Brother possibly John. Trying to determine Joseph’s parents names.” Giving clues about what you already know will save someone the trouble of giving you information you already have. Make sure you are in the right bulletin board. If the query isn’t in the Ipswich MA board, or the Smith board, it is probably in the wrong place.

CYNDI’s LIST at http://www.cyndislist.com/ has categorized and cross-referenced lists of links to other genealogical research sites online. For example, click on N for Norway, and you will find 337 links to other websites that will have helpful Norwegian information.

LIBRARIES and HISTORICAL SOCIETIES   The Family History Library in Salt Lake City has incredible resources. In fact, it can be overwhelming. A lot of what they have is available on line. They also do interlibrary loan with the local Family History Centers that are affiliated with the LDS churches. FHC have free access to Ancestry and other paid websites, as well as people who can help researchers Those also have lots of resources, and can order the microfilm you need. https://www.familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlc/ is the card catalog. Search on places, and Norway, for example, has 161 matching titles, including biographies, census records, histories, etc.

Town libraries frequently have family history sections with books, film, and even donated records. Most libraries will accept donated copies of your research if it is related to that area. A good way to get more data is to donate a file and then leave your contact information. Someone may want to either give you info, or get more from you. Use Google to search for a town library, then check to see what resources are available. Remember that the reference librarian will be your new best friend. She either already knows the answers, or knows where to find them, or knows how to get them on inter-library loan.
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NEWSPAPERS Chronicling America at http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/ contains searchable old newspapers from 1836 to 1922, in 25 states (including Montana). You can also use Cyndi’s List, browse categories – select N for newspapers, and you will find 742 newspaper links.

LANGUAGE LINKS – If you find records in a foreign language, you may be able to translate using a site like Google Translate at http://translate.google.com/# Just select the “from” language, and translate to English. Another similar site is http://www.freetranslation.com/ These may not be suitable for long documents, but might be good for translating simple documents such as BMDs.

GENEALOGY WEB LOGS – BLOGS
http://blogfinder.genealogue.com/ Blogs about specific surname, locations, technology
http://www.geneabloggers.com/genealogy-blogs/ Genealogy and family history
http://amberskyline.com/treasuremaps/create-genealogy-blog-1.html This site tells how to create a blog in order to attract other researchers, and open up opportunities to exchange information. This site gives specific information relating to “Blogger” which is owned by Google, but there are other free blog sites, such as WordPress.

Updates for Joseph Labor, Luvia Labor, Lydia Degoosh, Joseph Degoosh.

I recently wrote a short article for our local genealogy group newsletter about the benefits of blogging. The Internet has tons blogs about how to do research, find records, and select software. I chose to write mini biographies about people in my family tree. I realize that this reduces my potential interested audience mostly to cousins, near and distant, who share some of the same ancestors. Even so, I have enjoyed benefits of blogging, or otherwise sharing what I think I know about members of the family – such as contributing records to Find-A-Grave or posting family trees on Ancestry.
First, before I publish, I try to make sure I have the facts, and the records to support them, so preparing each blog forces me to check the details, and also to see if anything new has come along. If I didn’t get something documented, the time to do it is before I put it on line. Second, people contact me to share information. Third, they sometimes challenge the accuracy of my information. That sends me back to the first point. I was recently contacted by a distant cousin – we share the same great great grandfather, Joseph Labor: me from the first wife Marie-Celine Martin, while my half-third-cousin descends from Joseph’s second wife Lydia Degoosh. He made a suggestion to correct Lydia’s mother’s name from Elizabeth (Betsy) Schanershan to Shannon. I had seen it both ways, but hadn’t found a birth, marriage, or death record for her.
I went back through my records for the DeGoosh family, and found that for the four of her children for whom I have death records, they all list the mother as Betsy Shannon. I decided to look again, for her marriage record. There it was – in the Quebec vital records – right where I should have found it a long time ago. The marriage record names the bride of Joseph Degoosh as Betsy Ann Shannon. I decided to look at the family in the 1871 census – and this time remembering to look forward and backward from this family, I found Joseph Labor, his second wife Lydia, and their first child. I had looked and looked for him in this year. I don’t know why I had never found him before – even though his name was spelled Labour, it should have shown up in a phonetic or similarly-spelled name search.
Not being able to find Joseph in either the 1870 US or 1871 Canada census, I had assumed that after he married Lydia in Quebec, they moved to the US after the 1870 census was taken, and before the 1871 census. Apparently this was not so. As a result of these finds, I have updated by blogs about:

Joseph Degoosh http://sooze471.wordpress.com/2011/09/12/joseph-degoosh-died-12-september-1911/

Lydia Degoosh http://sooze471.wordpress.com/2011/08/06/lydia-ann-degoosh-born-6-august-1851/

Luvia Ann Labor http://sooze471.wordpress.com/2012/07/07/luvia-ann-labor/

Joseph Labor http://sooze471.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/joseph-labor-b-12-december-1832/

Of course new information creates new questions. Joseph’s two older sons were with his parents in 1871. Where was 6-year-old Marcel? I had expected that he would be with his father and new bride. Now having found that record, I see he’s not with them. Another mystery to solve.

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