Pierre Blaise b 29 Nov 1639

Pierre Blais probably left France from the port of La Rochelle in the Province of Aunis in 1664; destination Canada. The Dutch ship NOIR, under the command of Captain Pierre Filly of Dieppe, had at least fifty men aboard. The 24 year old Pierre is mentioned on the crew manifest as coming from Chef-Boutonne, capital of the Canton of Deux-Sevres. Pierre was the son of Mathurin Blais and Francoise Peniguat. Mathurin had a wife previous to Pierre’s mother. She was Marie Auchier whom he married on 9 November 1630, at Melleran, which used to be in the Province of Angouleme, but today is found in the Department of Deux-Sevres. In his second marriage on 30 April 1634, Mathurin conquered the heart of Franoise Penigaut. The witnesses to the marriage were Jean Carrier, Denis Richard, Nicolas Blanchard and the “procurer-fiscal” Pierre Alix. Moreover, and this is a rarity, we find the grandfather of Pierre at the ceremony: Jacques, married also to a Penigaud, one Louise, buried at Melleran on 2 December 1629. Our Ancestor Pierre Blaise was raised in the Parish of Hanc nearby Melleran, also in Angouleme. The records of this town do not go back beyond 1684; therefore it is not possible to find his baptismal certificate.

In the census of 1667 in New France, Pierre Blais is mentioned for the first time as living on the Ile d’Orleans and having been born about 1640, occupation laborer. Among his bachelor friends living on the Island we might note Jacques Tardif, Martin Poisson, and Francois Marcear.

On 22 June 1667, before the Notary Paul Vachon, Pierre Blais received a concession of land within the limits of the future parish of Saint-Jean. His neighbors were Antoine Poisson and Hyppolyte Thiviege. In 1681, the census taker notes that Pierre owned 4 head of cattle and 15 arpents of cleared land. It was on this farm that he would live for the remainder of his life – 33 more years.

Pierre Blais married Anne Perrot on 12 October 1669, at the Church of Saint-Famille on the Island. Anne Perrot, originally from Saint Sulpice in Paris, was the daughter of Jean and Jeanne Valta. She was a King’s daughter and brought a dowry into the family estimated at 300 livres. From this union, ten children were born: 8 boys and 2 girls, of whom 4 died at an early age. These four boys founded the family line: Pierre, Antoine, Jacques, and Jean. Anne, the mother, died in childbirth on 29 June 1688 and was buried the next day in the cemetery at Saint Jean, at about 45 years of age. Pierre remained a widower with two young infants, especially the poignant little Marguerite, born 29 June on her mother’s deathbed. It was she who would marry Etienne Lamy in 1714.

Pierre sought to reorganize his life, so on 18 April 1689 before Notary Paul Vachon, he nominated a guardian for his children, and had an inventory made of his possessions. On the following 5th of June, he married Elizabeth Royer at Saint-Jean; she was the daughter of Jean and Marie Targer. From this union five children were shown the light of day: a daughter Anne and 4 boys: Francois, Alexis, Louis-Charles, and Gabriel. The last, Gabriel, was born in March 1699 and adopted by Pierre Cloquet and his wife Marie Chaperon. Gabriel married at Boucherville on 31 May 1718.

Pierre Blais died suddenly on 16 February 1700 at about 60 years of age. His widow, Elizabeth Royer, married eight months later, it would be the 16th of November, to Robert Pepin at Saint Jean. She followed her husband to Montreal where she lived out the rest of her days. This couple put seven children into the world, then Elizabeth died and was buried on 22 June 1715 at Montreal.

Source: http://www.kencrouse.com/stories/pierre-blais.htm

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: