Lewis Labor died 7 January 1935

Louis LaBarre was born 8 November, and baptized 18 of November, 1860, at Wotton (St-Hyppolite) in Quebec, the son of Joseph Labarre, farmer, and Celina Martin, of St-Camille.  His godfather was Andre Martin (his mother’s father) and his godmother was Marie Manseau (his father’s mother). Louis had an older brother and sister who both died as infants.  He had two younger brothers, Frank Theophile and Marcel, who lived to have large families.

His mother Celina probably died between 1865 (when Marcel was born) and 1870, but I have not yet found her death record.  However, Louis’ father Joseph remarried 4 Aug 1879 to Lydia Ann DeGoosh. 

In 1871, Louis and his brother Theophile (Frank T) Labor lived with their grandparents, Pierre and Louise Labor, in St-Camille, Quebec.  Joseph and family moved to Barton VT.  In 1880, Lewis Laber is listed as a servant, living in the household of farmer George Dilley. 

On 22 August, 1882, in Barton, Lewis Labor of Barton, 24, laborer, born Bromton PQ, son of Joseph and Mary Labor, married Viola E. Downing of Barton, 17, born Barton, daughter of Henry A. and Mary J. Downing.  This was the first marriage for both, and was performed by S. S. Brigham, Minister of the Gospel (not a Catholic priest.) 

In the 1883-1884 Gazetteer and Business Directory Lamoille/Orleans County – Town of Barton Outside of Corporations listed Labor, Lewis, (South Barton) r 46, laborer.  The 1887 Barton town list shows Lewis with 2 oxen, 1 cow, 1 meat stock, 1 swine.  In 1897 Lewis Labor had 1 acre of land, and buildings, valued at $250.  Lacking the 1890 census, which was lost in a fire, the city directories and town reports help track our family members and tell us more about their lives.

The 1900 census for Barton lists Lewis (day laborer) and Viola and five of their six children, the eldest living elsewhere.  He reports that he came to the US in 1870, and citizenship is “alien.”  By 1910, Lewis and Viola had moved to Burke, where he was a farmer, and only the youngest two children still lived at home.  In this census, he reports that he came to the US in 1870, and is an alien.  In 1920, Lewis and Viola still lived in Burke, where Louis had a small dairy farm.  This census record says he came to the US in 1867, and is an alien. 

One of the benefits of picking a person of the day for my blog is that I try to go through all my records and notes to organize this narrative.  One mystery for me was the presence in the 1920 census household of Eunice Laber age 10 who is labeled “daughter.”  If that was the case, she would have been born about 1910, 14 years after the next oldest child.  I had thought that it was more likely that she was a granddaughter.  However, I did locate a death record for Eunice Labor Stevens, who was born 15 October 1909, and died 10 Feb 2004 in Newport VT.  She listed her parents as Lewis Labor and Viola Downing.  If she was born in 1909, she should have been in the 1910 census with Lewis and Viola, but she wasn’t there.  I searched the Barton Vermont birth records on Ancestry, and found only two recorded for that day.  One was Eunice May Smith, daughter of Ella Heath and Fred Smith.  I found Fred and Ella Smith in the 1910 census in Barton, with another daughter, Lulu, (or Lila?) age 3.  A family tree posted on Ancestry lists Ella Heath as the daughter of John Heath, so Ella’s brother is Ellsworth Heath, who married Lila Labor then Bertha Labor, both daughters of Louis.  Eunice, it turns out, is both Ellsworth’s niece, and his (adoptive) sister-in-law. 

The 1930 census of Burke VT lists Lewis and Viola Laber.  He was a farmer. Their Heath and Humphrey grandchildren lived with them.  This census record says he came to the US in 1870, and his citizenship is listed as “alien”. 

Viola died 7 May 1934.  On 7 Jan 1935, Lewis died of self-inflicted gun-shot wound to the head.  He had lived many years at his residence of Hill Farm, West Burke, VT. 

In some records Louis sometimes reported that he was born in Biddeford, Maine. For example, his death certificate indicated he was born in Biddeford Maine, on 30 Dec 1856.   In theory, he could have been, and then taken to Quebec to be baptized in the Catholic church.  Using modern routes, it is 210 miles from Biddeford to Wotton.  Could the family, with an infant, travel that far in 10 days?  In all census records as listed above, he reported being born in Canada, with French as his native language.

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3 Comments

  1. rudyh said,

    December 27, 2016 at 20:36

    Bertha Tulip, Heath, Humphrey is my Great Grandmother. Her son Lawrence E. “Happy” Tulip Sr. is my Grandfather. We just started doing a genealogy of our family and had run into a a quagmire on the Labor and Tulip sides and got stuck at Joseph Tulip and Bertha Labor. The Tulip log jam was broken with a “LaTullipe” discovery and thanks to your blog the Labor side has enough information to snowball a bunch more connections. Thank You!

    Rudy Hanecak III
    Son of Deborah Lynn Tulip
    who is the Daughter of Lawrence Tulip Sr
    who is the son of Bertha Labor
    who is the daughter of Lewis and Viola (Downing) Labor

    • sooze471 said,

      December 27, 2016 at 22:22

      Thanks for reading, and taking the time to comment. With both William and Bertha having multiple marriages, it did take me a while to sort out all the children. My interest is on the Laber/Labor side, but I did make a note that William was son of Joseph William Latulippe and Philomina Emma Guiguiere. You’re probably past that point by now.

  2. Lynn said,

    August 26, 2017 at 08:53

    Thank you for the narrative. Louis Labor and Viola Dowing were my Grandfathers parents. Arved Uzeal Labor, my Grandfather had three sisters, Agnes L, Cora M., and Bertha E. His brother was Arthur H Labor, if that helps your search. Just a note to name variations, Viola was born a Dowing in Vermont. Louis Labor was born in Wotton, Quebec, Canada-French. His immigration was in 1870.


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