Ruth Taylor born 10 May 1808

Ruth Taylor was born 10 May 1808, probably in Wilmot, in Nova Scotia.  She was the first child of Stephen Taylor and his first wife, Tamson Morton. 

Ruth married Jonathan Hodges, an immigrant from County Cork, Ireland. I have not yet found the marriage record, but the first child was born in 1826. In 1826, Jonathan and Ruth received a land grant of 200 acres near Wilmot.  Nearby were John C Hodges and wife Rachel Parker, and her father Henry Parker. 

In 1827, the census lists the Hodges family as farmers in Wilmot.  

The 1838 census listed Ruth’s husband as a shoemaker – an occupation followed, to some degree, by their sons Stephen and Boardman. 

Ruth was Jonathan’s second wife, but apparently mother of all nine children. This is according to historian Chute, who was reporting on the Taylor family, and did not name Jonathan’s first wife. One child, John Wesley Hodges, probably died as a child.  Jonathan and Tamson died as young adults who had married and had children.  Mary Ann, Ralph, William, Rebecca, Stephen and Boardman all lived in to the 1910s and 1920s. 

Ruth was baptized on 8 May, 1842, at the age of 24. 

The 1851 census lists the family in Aylesford sub-district.  The 1861 census lists them in Kings County with a poling district number (not a community) listed.

Ruth’s father died in 1859, and the list of heirs named her as Ruth Hodges.  The fact that a son is named Stephen Taylor Hodges (after her father) and a daughter is named Tamson (after her mother) helps confirm the family connections, even without a marriage record yet located. 

The family lived in the Morristown area.  I am not sure if this is the original location of the land grant, or if they moved.  As the area became more developed, more communities formed, and a person’s home town could change without the family moving.   

Ruth’s husband died 25 Jun 1869 in Morristown.  Ruth was the main heir, to receive all household goods, and water to be brought to her, use of a quiet horse and wagon or sleigh for her to visit her friends or go to any place of worship; six pounds of good sheep wool, £15 in cash or produce.  The farm itself was bequeathed to their son Jonathan but Ruth had rights to a bedroom and the kitchen.   

In the 1871 census, Ruth was listed with her son Jonathan and wife Henrietta in Aylesford.  She was also listed in Onslow, with daughter Mary (and James Stevens).  Perhaps she was just visiting Mary during the time of the census.  In 1881, Ruth lived with son William and family back in Morristown. 

I have not been able to locate any records for Ruth after 1881.  I suspect that she died sometime between the 1881 and 1891 census.  She and Jonathan are probably buried in the old Baptist cemetery in Morristown.  Although there is no longer a marker, this is where her brother-in-law John is buried, as well some of her children.

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2 Comments

  1. Jane (Taylor) Duchene said,

    May 21, 2017 at 19:06

    Susan, who is this historian, Chute who you said is reporting on the Taylors? Tamson Morton Taylor is my great great great grandmother. I am a Taylor, and I believe I’ve acquired most of what there is to know on the Taylor line, but wonder if Chute could have more?

    • sooze471 said,

      May 21, 2017 at 19:25

      The book is “A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America” by William E Chute. Pub 1894. It is available on line at Chute Family in America

      He does have a few pages on the Taylors including James (father of Deacon Stephen Taylor). But note that Chute thought James is the son of Eldad (rather than Stephen Taylor and Bennett Ingraham).


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