Rose M Granfield-Keen Chick Keen Roberts 1885-1969

I have written about Charles Winfield Chick in the past – my very multi married (10 documented wives so far) distant cousin-in-law well removed.  I decided to try to find out where all the wives came from, and what happened to them afterwards.  This is the story of Charles’ first marriage – apparently the only legitimate marriage of the first seven (that he admitted to in court).

On 1 September 1907, in Revere, MA, Charles married Rosie M Keen.  Charles, 21, was a spindle straightener (probably for textile mill machines) living in Biddeford ME, born in Kittery, the son of Caleb W Chick and Almeda Eaton.  Rosie was 19, “at home”, in Revere, born in Amesbury MA, daughter of Nathaniel J Keen and Rosie Burchum.  Knowing Rose’s parents, and where she lived, it should have been easy to find more information.  I did find parents Nathaniel and Rose in the 1900 census, but the children had the last name Way.  In looking at how the children were listed, it appears that an older now-widowed daughter Lillian had been married to a Way, and the rest of the children should have been listed as Keene.  But the indexers listed all the children as Way.  They show up on several Ancestry trees in this manner, even though there are no records to support that Dora, Rosa, Robert, or Hiram (who is really Herman) have the last name Way.  Another issue is that according to the census, Nathaniel and Rosa have only been married two years, but she has five children, all still living.  So are the children Nathaniel’s from his previous wife Sarah F Morrill?  Are they Rosa’s from a previous marriage?

Massachusetts marriage records show that Lillian Burcham, daughter of Edward Kent and Rosa Burcham married Fred Henry Way in 1896.  She was in the 1900 census with Nathaniel and Rose, and that explains why the census taker, who was merely listing all the children in order, caused confusion about the last name of the younger children.

Still, accepting that all the children listed in that census are really Keen, and searching on the last name only, with the parents being Nathaniel J Keen and Rose Burchum, I was not able to find birth, marriage, or death records for any of those children, with the exception of Rose and her marriage to Charles Chick.  One on-line tree said that Nathaniel died in 1938 in Rockingham County, NH.  Ancestry has a good selection of newspapers from Portsmouth, in Rockingham County, and I found the death notice for Nathaniel.  It mentioned “survived by” family members, and one was his step-daughter Mrs. Charles W Keen.   I found a marriage record for Charles W Keen to Rosie May Granfield, daughter of Robert C Granfield and Rosie Burchum.  With that information, I was able to find birth records for several Granfield children with parents Rosie Burchum and Robert Granfield that matched the children in the 1900 census with Rosie and Nathaniel.

Young Rose had several brothers and sisters:  half-sister Lillian (Lily May) Kent born in 1880; Dora Granfield b 1885 (she also married a Keen – Arthur); Charles born in 1887, died in 1888; Rose in 1888; Robert b 1889; Herman b 1891; George b/d  1895; Unnamed b/d in 1898.

So Rosie Keen who married Charles W Chick was really Rosie Granfield, and then she confused me by marrying in 1911 to Charles W Keen (no relation at least two generations back, to her step-father Nathaniel Keen).   Rose and Charles lived in Salem and Lawrence MA, and they had a son Charles born about 1914.  Rose’s husband was a blacksmith in an iron factory.  In 1930 they lived in Lawrence MA, and Charles was a salesman at a mill.  In 1935, they lived in Methuen, but by 1938 had moved to North Salem NH, according to Rose’s step-father’s obituary.

The Portsmouth newspaper reported in December 1938 the divorce of Charles Keen of Salem NH and Rosie Keen, parts unknown.

I wasn’t able to find Rosie Keen in the 1940 census, or in death records. I decided to look for any Rosie with her date of birth, 8 July 1888, in the Social Security Death Index.  One that looked likely was Rose Roberts who died in 1969 in Methuen.  She had links to that town – her son lived there.  The Rose most likely to be that person was in the 1940 census, born in 1888, wife of Watkins W Roberts.  I was not able to find a marriage record that directly linked Watkins to Rose, but did find Watkins in an index as marrying in 1938 in Metheun MA.  Unfortunately, the index doesn’t list the spouse, but does list the volume and page number.  And by searching the index using the page numbers, I was able to find that Rose Granfield Keen had also married in 1938 in Metheun, and the index numbers matched.

Watkins was an attorney and 1897 graduate of Harvard.  The Harvard 25th anniversary book for the class of 1897 gives his birth date as 14 October, 1875, at Lawrence, MA, son of Michael Roberts and Mary Elizabeth Crawford.  (His maternal grandmother was a Kean from Scotland – just a coincidence, I’m sure.) In his yearbook entry, he writes:  In 1898 I took a bicycle trip through France, southern Germany, Switzerland, the Austrian Tyrol, and Italy.  In 1900 I was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar, and since that time I have been engaged in general practice at Lawrence, Mass.  I was secretary of the Board of Park Commissioners from 1907 to 1912; am assistant clerk of District Court of Lawrence, secretary of the Lawrence Bar Association, and a member of the Lawrence Press Club.  I have traveled on business and pleasure trips through Canada, and a large part of the United States.  Fishing and hunting are my principal recreations.  During the war I served in the Massachusetts Field Artillery, from 1907 to 1917; commanded C Battery, 1st Mass., F.A.N.G., on Mexican Border service, from June to November, 1916.  In April, 1917, was transferred to Mass. N.G. Reserve.  Offered services in World War, but was not accepted.  Since graduation I have worked some, studied some, acquired fair knowledge of two additional modern languages, played some, suffered some, had my fair share of the joys of life, am endowed with worldly goods, “not much, not little, but just between”; in short, during the last twenty-five years I have pulled just about an average oar, and am still on the course.  I have published several short stories, special articles, and verses, of no special importance.  Am now conducting, as a sort of indoor sport, two weekly newspaper columns for the Standard Company of Pittsburgh. 

Soon after submitting his autobiography for publishing in the yearbook, Watkins married Minerva V Holmes on 28 Apr 1923.  Watkins worked as an attorney and clerk in district court.  He apparently continued his love of travel.  In October of 1938, he sailed from Naples to New York on the SS Conte di Savoia.  He was listed as widowed.

Rose’s father, step-father, and second husband were all blacksmiths.  Marrying an attorney would probably be seen as a step up in society for her.  Rose’s marriage to Charles Chick was short, and since he joined the Navy and was away much of the time, it was probably a lonely time for her.  Her second marriage did not work out. I hope that Rose had a good life for the twenty years she was with Watkins.  Watkins died in 1958 and Rose died in 1969.

 

 

 

 

 

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Ethel Leyshon 1895-1969

Ethel Leyshon was born 7 March, 1895, in Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales.  Her parents were Christopher Leyshon and Elizabeth Woodland.  She had older siblings, Annie Mary born in 1892 and John Henry born in 1894.  The 1901 census shows the family on Bartlett Street of Eglwysilan (parish of St. Martin’s).  Christopher was a coal miner.  Although Elizabeth was born in England, she (along with Christopher) spoke both English and Welsh.  The children spoke only English.

In 1911, the family lived at 52 Cardiff Road in Caerphilly in Wales. This was a six room house.   The census shows that Ethel’s older sister Annie died between 1901 and 1911, and there is an Anna Mary Leyshon who was buried in 1902 at Caerphilly St. Martin.  Ethel’s father and brother John were both coal mine hewers.  The hewer is the person responsible for actually digging the coal, loosening it from the coal bed.

Senghenydd Colliery Disaster of 14 October 1913 killed 439 miners and one rescuer, near Caerphilly.  I don’t know what mine Christopher and John worked in, but this explosion, the worst mining accident in the UK, must have killed friends and maybe even family members.  Perhaps this disaster helped Christopher and Elizabeth decide to move to the United States.  Or perhaps they hoped to avoid the Great War, which started in July 1914.

Ethel sailed with her parents on the SS Tuscania, leaving Liverpool on 16 October, 1915.  The Tuscania was a new ship, a luxury liner only a year old.  (On 5 February, 1918, the Tuscania was carrying 2000 American troops from New Jersey to Liverpool, England, across the North Atlantic.  The ship was torpedoed, and sank in about four hours, with a lost of 210 men.)

The ship’s manifest lists Christopher as a collier, and they could all read and write.  They arrived in New York on 26 October, 1915.  They were on their way to Youngstown, Ohio, with only $30, to meet up with their son John, who had emigrated in 1914 and was already working in the steel industry.  The passenger list indicates that Ethel was medically certified as having Rigg’s disease, or gum disease, resulting in loss of teeth.  This was recorded for several of the passengers on this same passenger sheet.  A person who was medically certified was at risk for not being allowed entry into the US.  I don’t know if this certification prevented Ethel’s entry at this time.

Christopher and Elizabeth did reach Youngstown, and were counted in the 1920 census there.  Christopher worked in the steel industry.  Ethel was not in that household and I have not yet found her in the 1920 census.  Christopher and Elizabeth were listed in the 1926 Youngstown city directory, living at 20 Edwards.  Both John and Christopher were employed by the Ohio Works – a steel company.  The 1927 directory includes Ethel, living with her parents.

On 7 May 1928, Ethel married Charles Winfield Chick, in Youngstown.  Charles was the son of Caleb and Augusta Chick, born in 1889 in Maine.  Charles was a sailor, sometimes in the Navy, sometimes in the Merchant Marine, sometimes working at the Navy Yard.  I’m not sure what brought him to Youngstown, but perhaps his experience working in the Navy Yard made him a candidate for a job in the steel industry.

Ethel’s father Christopher died on 28 September 1928 in Youngstown, of brocho pneumonia.  Ethel and Charles, and her mother Elizabeth, moved to Lynn, Massachusetts.  About a year into her marriage, Ethel discovered letters that made her suspicious that Charles had other wives.  She reported him to the police, and they were able to track him down to another woman’s residence, where he was in the process of proposing to yet another potential bride.

The investigation revealed that Charles had been married in 1907 to Rosie in Massachusetts,  in 1911 to Leona in Florida, in 1919 to Loretta in Maine, and in 1923 to Hilda, also in Maine, before marrying Ethel in 1928 in Ohio, and none of the prior wives were divorced from him, nor deceased.  Charles reportedly had a wife named Yvette in Paris, and perhaps even a wife in Cuba, and in the Panama Canal Zone.

Charles had apparently wooed the women with Biblical and other quotations to the effect that “If a man and a woman cannot agree after marriage he shall go to the farthest corner of the earth and find another woman and she shall do the same.” That was apparently the process that Charles followed, without bothering to get a divorce.

At the trial in 1929, five of the wives, including Ethel, testified against Charles, and he eventually admitted to having seven wives.  He was sentenced to a year in prison.  Afterwards, Charles married three more times, and he died in 1958 in Maine.

The 1930 census lists Ethel and her mother living at 60 Howard street in Lynn.  Ethel was a garment factory stitcher.  By 1935, they had moved to 14 Cleveland and the 1940 census lists Ethel as an inspector for a sewing project.  This was as a government employee in a Works Progress Administration job.  The projects taught women to use sewing machines, and they made clothing and bedding for hospitals and orphanages.

The last record I have for Ethel’s mother is a listing in the 1941 Lynn city directory.  After that, she may have died, or moved back to Youngstown, OH, to be near her son.  In 1945, Ethel lived at 49 Campbell Terrace, and her mother was not listed with her.

While still living in Caerphilly, Ethel had become friends with a young man named William Charles Carnell (or Carnall) who was working in the nearby mines in the Aber Valley. When the war of 1914 started, William went to France.  He was blinded at Loos in September of 1915.  Ethel’s family moved to the  US in October 1915.  William was released from the Army  and went to St. Dunstan’s, a facility developed to help train those blinded in the war.  William became a successful poultry farmer in Kiln Cottage, Bampton, Devon.  Over the years, Ethel made numerous attempts to locate him, and eventually was able to establish correspondence with William.  In about 1943, they agreed to marry, but because of the war-time restrictions, she was not able to travel back to England.  In October, 1946, she traveled on the ocean liner Queen Elizabeth’s first peace-time voyage from the US to England, and Ethel and William were married 21 November 1946 at the Methodist Church in Bampton.

William died 6 Jan 1962 in Tiverton, Devonshire, England.  He left his estate valued at £2391 to his widow Ethel.  His death was reported in St. Dunstan’s Review, a sort of alumni newsletter from the facility for blind soldiers that he attended when released from the army:  Lance Corporal William Charles Carnall, 2nd Royal Irish Rifles.  It is with deep regret that we record the death of W. C. Carnall, of Bampton, Devon.  He was  69.  Enlisting in September, 1914, he left the Army in February, 1916, and came straight to St. Dunstan’s where he trained in boot repairing and poultry keeping.  He continued with this work and was still keeping poultry up to August, 1960.  He had intended to renew his stock but in the autumn of 1961 his health broke down and in October, he went to Pearson House.  He became seriously ill but returned home at his own wish on November 10th, where he died on January 6th.  Our deep sympathy  goes out to Mrs. Carnall, who was Billy’s second wife, but whose friendship with our St. Dunstaner went back some forty years before their marriage in 1946.  At the outbreak of war in 1914 he had gone to France and Miss Leyshon, as she was then, went to the United States. 

Ethel died in December, 1969, in Cardiff, Wales.

 

 

Charles S Clearn and Family

Charles was October 1863 in Lynn, Massachusetts.  His parents were James William McClearn from Nova Scotia, and Olive Parker from Maine, who had married in Salem on 11 Aug 1859.  James and Olive were counted in the 1860 census in Lynn, with their 1 month old daughter Ida. (Ida died at age 2 months.)  James was a cordwainer, a person who makes new shoes out of new leather (as opposed to a cobbler who repaired shoes.)  The 1860 census listed the value of James’ personal property at only $100, the least amount for any family on that census page.  The 1860 Lynn city directory lists James as a boarder at 60 South Common.  City directories at this time and place did not name the wives, unless they ran their own business, such as a boarding house, or unless they were listed as “widow of” or divorced and head of the household.  The 1863 directory lists William McClearn, shoemaker, living at 13 Prospect.  Since Charles was born in 1863, it is likely that he was born at this house. 

The 1865 directory lists William McClearn, shoemaker, house on Stickney near Commercial.  The 1865 state census shows a move to nearby Saugus.  The family includes Charles’ older brother William, born in 1861.  By 1869, the family was back in Lynn, as J. William McClearn, shoemaker, was listed on West Neptune.  Charles’ twin brothers Eugene and George were born 14 September 1869.  Eugene died at age one month of “canker”.  This is an eroding ulcer of the check and lip, generally seen in ill-fed children. 

The 1870 census shows Charles with his parents, and new younger siblings Ida (second of that name) and George. George died at age 11 months of cholera infantum, a common disease in the summer among the poor.  James is a worker in a shoe factory.  The next year, the family moved to the rear part of the house at 7 Mt. Vernon. 

By 1880, at age 16, Charles is working in a shoe factory, along with 18-year-old William, and their father. The family lived at 440 Western avenue.  A new addition to the family is his younger sister, Eliza Jane (later known as Jennie).   Although not technically an adult, because he is working, Charles is now listed in the city directories.   

After 1882 Charles’ father is not seen in the Lynn directories.  In 1883, Charles’ brother William died. 

On 25 Sep 1885, Charles (now as Clearn) married Minnie Blanche McKeown in Lynn.  He was listed as a shoemaker, and Minnie was an “operator”.  The record doesn’t indicate that she works for a telephone company, and it is more likely that she operates some kind of machinery in a factory.  Minnie’s parents were William McKeown and Rebecca Hodges of Middleton, Nova Scotia.  I found no record of children for Charles and Minnie.  It appears that the marriage ended about 1894, as the city directory shows Minnie Clearn living at a separate address.  In the 1901 Canada census, she was listed as divorced, living back in Nova Scotia.  During these years, Charles lived at 29 North Common, 112 North Common, 28 Blossom, 117 Jefferson, and 19 Olive.  The city directories listed Charles’ mother Olive, and sister Jennie at these same residences.  Part of the time his brother-in-law Charles Janvrin (Ida’s husband) was listed at the same home, so it can be inferred that all the surviving members of the McClearn/Clearn family lived together.  Because Charles’ mother was listed as “Mrs. Olive” rather than “widow of James”, it appears that James was out of the family group, rather than deceased.  Olive died in Lynn on 10 May 1896, of chronic bronchitis. 

The 1900 census shows Charles Clearn living in a boarding house at 18 Ireson, and he lived there at least seven years.  On 24 Nov 1908, in Lynn, Charles married Annie M Dalton, widow of Peter H Martin.  Anne had a daughter Anne from her previous marriage, and young Anne may have lived with Annie and Charles until her own marriage three years later.   

In the 1910 census Charles and Annie lived at 35 Rand and both worked in a shoe shop.  In 1914, Annie travelled to Ketchikan, Alaska, with her son-in-law.  Her daughter and grandchildren lived in Skagway.  This is the last record I currently have for Anne.  Charles was not with her on the boat.  The 1914 city directory lists Charles at 35 Rand. 

I have not yet found Charles in the 1920 census.  His sisters Jennie and Ida (now divorced) lived in Cambridge, but he was not with them. 

The 1930 census lists Charles as a boarder at the hospital of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia.  He was a washerman in the hospital laundry.  Because there was a different section in the census for inmates (patients) it appears that he was an employee. He was listed as single. 

Charles died 15 Jan 1938 at this same hospital, of myocarditis and acute coronary thrombosis.  The informant for his death certificate was his sister Ida Janvrin from Dighton, MA.  Charles was buried at Belvue cemetery in Philadelphia.  In 1951, the bodies were reinterred at Philadelphia Memorial Park and Belvue became a shopping center parking lot. 

Charles’ sister Ida died in 1949, and Jennie died in 1955.

I attempted to find out what happened to Charles’ father James.  His marriage record to Olive listed him as son of John and Jemima.  IGI (International Genealogical Index) lists a James Caldwell McClearn, born Feb 1834, to John McClearn and Jemima Stewart.  The 1900 census lists a James C McClearn born Feb 1834 as an inmate at the alms house in Marblehead.  He is listed as married (no wife with him at the alms house). James C Mclearn lived in Salem in 1906, and did shoe repair and the 1907 directory lists him as deceased.   I found a death record for James C McClearn born 1834 in Nova Scotia.  This man died 9 Sep 1906 in Tewksbury at the state hospital.  His father was John, maiden name of mother was Stewart.  His occupation was cobbler.  Unfortunately, the hospital was the informant for the death certificate, which might have provided a link to another family member.  I’m not positive that this James is the same person, but there are some connections that make this likely to be Charles’ father.